AI Birlinghoven Castle

Fleischmann & Strauss
© fleischmann-strauss.de ; Fleischmann & Strauss

(collective) Monika Fleischmann | Wolfgang Strauss

AI Birlinghoven Castle , ongoing
Co-workers & Funding
Computer Scientist Christian A. Bohn playing with Connection Machine CM5 directed by Monika Fleischmann und Wolfgang Strauss
Produced at VISWIZ / GMD Gesellschaft für Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung
fleischmann-strauss.de
Documents
  • Birlinghoven Castle-CM2_Best
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  • Birlinghoven-Castle-CM2-Bildsynthese
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  • CM2-4er
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  • CM2-Tablea-CUT-OUT
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  • CM2-21
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  • CM2-Blue green 4er
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Description
BIRLINGHOVEN CASTLE : GENERATIVE CM5 SERIES 1993

Remembering AI in the early 1990s: Image generation with the CM-5 connection machine of the Thinking Machines Corporation at the GMD - National Research Center for Information Technology.

We're sitting at the terminal of the Connection Machine CM 5, a parallel computer from Thinking Machines, using the demo program for generative image synthesis. After entering a starting image, in this case a digital photo of Birlinghoven Castle, a grid of twenty mutations of the original image is displayed. The human activity is as follows: Start with an image and use the mouse cursor to cross one variant with another. Based on the RGB color values of each individual pixel, two images are crossed and rendered generatively in real time. The result is a slightly different or even completely new image. The process resembles Mendel's law of inheritance in plants. It is a manipulative shift of the color values of the pixels by the underlying algorithm. Each crossing of the image variants creates an infinite number of new variations of the original image.

Ever since images have been described digitally, they can be said to have something of a DNA, namely the description of the RGB color values for each pixel in the image. Changing the RGB color values can cause a 24-bit image to have pixel in 16.7 million different colors.
It becomes clear that the essence of digital color is that it does not represent anything that can be thought of as color in any way until the moment it is represented; it is a digital data set that is modulated according to certain protocols and appears in the world as colored light on the screen. And here human activity continues if one wants to evaluate the images. Inevitably, however, you will continue to cross images until the results seem good enough, or until individual explanatory patterns come to mind. For our laboratory's image brochure, we used the metamorphic image of Birlinghoven Castle, which gives the audience the impression of a place of creative research.
Keywords
  • genres
    • digital graphics
  • technology
    • displays
      • electronic displays
    • hardware
      • mice (input device)
    • interfaces
      • automatic identification and data capture (AIDC)
    • software
      • software interfaces
Technology & Material
Hardware
Connection Machine CM 5. On board mage Processing Software.
Exhibitions & Events
Bibliography